Julian’s Comments (2)

Julian’s Comments (1)

Chapter 51

The answere to the doute afor by a mervelous example of a lord and a servant; and God will be abidyn, for it was nere twenty yeres after ere she fully understode this example; and how it is understod that Crist syttith on the ryth hand of the Fader. Fifty-first chapter.

And then our courteous Lord answered
in a parable, a wonderful example,
of a lord with a servant,
giving me insight into both my doubts.
This sight was shown double,
both in the lord, and in his servant.

One part was shown spiritually
but with bodily likeness,
and the other part more spiritually
without bodily likeness.

Thus for the first:
I saw two persons in bodily likeness,
that is to say, a lord and a servant.
In spirit, I also saw the lord was sitting,
solemn, in rest and in peace;
the servant standing by,
reverently ready to do his lord’s will.

The lord looks upon his servant lovingly,
and sweetly and meekly sends him
to a certain place to do his will.

The servant, not only goes
but suddenly starts and runs
in great haste, loving to do his lord’s will,
but shortly falls in a small ravine
causing himself great soreness.
He groans and moans, and wails and writhes,
but cannot get up or help himself
in any way.

But I only saw discouragement in him;
and nothing worse than that
He did not turn his face on his loving lord,
who was full of comfort and quite near him;
but like a feeble, unwise man
he only thought of his feelings all the time,
enduring in his woe,
in which he suffered seven great pains.

First the sore bruising of his fall
which was physical pain to him.
Second, the heaviness of his body.
Third the feebleness following these two.
Fourth, he was blinded in his reason,
so shocked he had almost forgotten his own love.
Fifth, that he could not get up.
The sixth was most amazing to me
which was that he lay alone.
I looked all around,
and far nor near, high nor low,
I saw no help for him.

The seventh was the place where he lay:
long, hard, and grievous.
I wondered how he could meekly suffer all this woe.

I watched carefully for any fault in him,
any blame his lord held him in,
and truly there was none.
His fall was caused by his good will
and his great desire alone.
He was as unhateful and as good inwardly
as when he stood before his lord
ready to do his will.

And this is how his loving lord,
constant and tender, watched over him now,
with a double expression –
first: outward, fully meek, mild,
with great grief and love;
second: inward, more spiritual.
This guided my understanding of the lord,
he delighted highly in the honourable rest
and nobility he wished to bring his servant
by his plentiful grace.

Keeping both in mind,
my thoughts were drawn to the first.

Then this courteous lord thought:
See, see, my beloved servant,
what harm and unease he has taken
in my service, for my love,
yes, and for his good will;
should I not reward him
for his affray, his fear, his hurt and injury
and all his woe?

And should I not give him a gift,
better and more to be honoured
than his own health should have been?
I think not to do so would be ungracious.

An inward, spiritual showing of the lord’s thoughts
came down into my soul.
I saw that it was fitting,
considering his greatness and honour,
that his dear servant he loved so much
should be rewarded, truly, blissfully, endlessly,
above what should have been if he had not fallen.
So much that his falling and his woe
shall be turned to high, surpassing worship;
to endless bliss.

Here, the vision vanished.
Our good Lord guided my mind
in the Revelation to the end.
But despite all this guidance,
the wonder of the example never left me
for I thought it was given me in answer to my doubts.

Yet I could not be fully eased,
for in the servant that was shown for Adam,
as I shall show,
I saw many varied properties
that could in no way refer to one Adam.

I was greatly confused.
For, at that time, this wonderful example
was not fully explained to me;
three properties of the revelation
were deeply hidden in its mysterious example.

Nevertheless, I saw and understood,
that every showing is full of secrets.
Now I am somewhat eased, and can tell those three properties.

First is the early teaching I understood then.
Second, the inward learning I have understood since.
Third, the whole revelation from beginning to end,
that is to sey, of this book,
which our Lord God, of His goodness
often freely brings to light my understanding.

These three are so united in my mind
that I cannot, may not, separate them.
And as these three are as one,
I have been taught to believe
and trust in our Lord God,
that in the same goodness and purpose in which He showed it,
so, by that same goodness and purpose,
He shall declare it to us when it is His will.

One thought on “Julian’s Comments (2)

  1. Pingback: Julian’s comments on her first 14 revelations (1). – anthonyinuk

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s